I would explain to the female worker that sexual harassment is a complex and contentious issue in the workplace given the subtle forms in which it can take (DeNisi & Griffin, 2005). In addition, I would explain this as a problem of a wrong history that has played less attention to female suppression, especially, in the sexual sense. I would inform the female worker that she possesses the right to report anything that causes her distress. Besides, I would also inform the male co-worker that she was uncomfortable with the advances.

I would also inform the male co-worker that whatever he had been doing amounted to sexual harassment because it caused distress to the female worker. I would inform him that even if such behavior did not cause distress to the female worker, it would still entail sexual harassment given the new definitions of sexual harassment. Furthermore, I would highlight the idea of power play in such a relationship. In as much as the male co-worker may not have interpreted the situation as involving power play, I would highlight that the fellow female employee might have interpreted the same as a power game (DeNisi & Griffin, 2005).

The male employee, thus, may easily have seen the behavior as harmless in as much as it made the female unsettled. In turn, I would that this was because he believed that his equally shared status with the female worker would prevent the female co-worker from feeling the harassment. More essentially, I would inform the male employee that such repeated advances create an uncomfortable emotional environment for the female employee.

Reference

DeNisi, A. S., & Griffin, R. W. (2005). Human resource management. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.

harassment